omori all endings
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Omori – all four endings explained

“Omori” is a psychological horror RPG developed by Omocat that features four different endings that players can achieve based on their actions and choices throughout the game.

True Ending of Omori

The True Ending in “Omori” is considered the game’s canon ending and is achieved by completing all side quests, finding all of the secrets, and making certain choices throughout the game’s main story.

The scene of True Ending in Omori can be unlocked by tending to Basil’s plants in the HEADSPACE with two days left. Failing to do so will result in this scene not being available.

In this ending, players uncover the truth about the game’s world and its characters, revealing that many of the events that took place throughout the game were actually a result of the protagonist, Omori’s, repressed memories and trauma.

The ending provides closure to many of the game’s storylines, including resolving conflicts between the characters and uncovering the true nature of Omori’s relationship with his friends. The ending also has a significant impact on the game’s themes of mental health, coping with trauma, and the power of human connection.

Without spoiling too much, the True Ending is a more emotionally satisfying conclusion to the game and reveals important details that are not available in the other endings. Achieving the True Ending requires a significant amount of effort and exploration, but many players consider it to be the most rewarding and fulfilling ending in the game.

Hikikomori Ending explained

The Hikikomori Ending in “Omori” is one of the game’s four possible endings and can be achieved by following a specific path in the game. This path involves making certain choices and completing certain objectives that result in the main character, Omori, becoming a shut-in hikikomori and refusing to leave his room or engage with the outside world.

In this ending, Omori is shown to be trapped in a self-imposed isolation, which is presented as a metaphor for the protagonist’s mental state and struggles with depression and anxiety. The ending is considered to be a bad ending because it is incomplete and does not provide a resolution to many of the game’s storylines.

While the Hikikomori Ending may be an interesting path to take for players who want to explore the game’s themes of mental health and coping with trauma, it ultimately provides a less satisfying conclusion to the game’s narrative. It’s worth noting that the Hikikomori Ending is not the same as the True Ending, which is considered to be the game’s canon ending and is achieved by completing all side quests and exploring the game’s world to its fullest extent.

The Bad Ending of Omori

The Bad Ending in “Omori” is one of the game’s four possible endings, which can be achieved by completing the game’s main story without fulfilling certain requirements. This ending is considered to be unsatisfying and does not provide closure to many of the game’s storylines.

In the Bad Ending, players will not have completed all the side quests, and as a result, certain conflicts between the characters are left unresolved. Additionally, the player is left with unanswered questions about the game’s world and characters, and the game’s central themes of mental health, trauma, and human connection are not fully explored.

The Bad Ending is not considered to be a fulfilling conclusion to the game and is often viewed as a disappointment by players who invest significant time and effort into the game. However, the ending does provide a different perspective on the game’s story and characters, and some players may find it interesting to explore as part of their overall experience with the game.

It’s worth noting that achieving the Bad Ending is not a requirement to unlock the game’s other endings, and players can still explore the game’s world and story to its fullest extent without achieving this ending.

The Normal Ending of Omori

The Normal Ending in “Omori” is one of the game’s four possible endings and can be achieved by completing the game’s main story without fulfilling all of the requirements for the True Ending or the Hikikomori Ending.

In this ending, players will have completed the game’s main story but will not have explored all of the game’s side quests or secrets. While the ending provides some closure to the game’s storylines, many questions are left unanswered, and some of the conflicts between the characters remain unresolved.

The Normal Ending is considered to be a relatively satisfying conclusion to the game and may be the ending that most players achieve during their first playthrough. While the ending does not reveal the full extent of the game’s world or its characters, it still provides an emotional and poignant resolution to the game’s central themes of mental health, trauma, and human connection.

While the Normal Ending may not provide as much closure as the True Ending, it still offers a satisfying conclusion to the game’s story and provides a compelling and thought-provoking experience for players. Some players may choose to pursue the other endings to fully explore the game’s world and characters, while others may be content with the Normal Ending as a fitting end to their experience with the game.

Which Omori ending is canon?

The game Omori does not have an officially declared “canon” ending by its creator, Omocat. Each ending, from the ones where Sunny fails to save Basil, to the one where he wakes up in a hospital, is equally valid. They each offer different perspectives on dealing with trauma and guilt. The idea of a “True Ending” is mostly a player interpretation rather than an author statement.

How many endings does Omori have?

3 main ending and there are a few variations to these, so it can be 5 or 7 endings.

Which Omori ending is the True Ending?

In the Good / True Ending of Omori, the player must engage in a fight with Basil after waking up in his house, and then face Omori in Sunny’s memories. The player must then lose this fight to reach the Game Over screen. Choosing to continue will trigger the Good Ending.

In this ending, Sunny plays the violin, performing the duet he was supposed to play with Mari. As he plays, his memories, both good and bad, are shown. Omori disappears after embracing Sunny, symbolizing Sunny’s acceptance of the truth. The scene ends with Sunny waking up in a hospital bed, covered in bandages, crying over Mari’s death.

About the author

Tom Henry

I worked as a PM in video games, now I'm trying some new things.

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